Alberto de la Pena and Eduardo Marquez in the Dallas Morning News: Mexican Professionals Bringing Ambition, Startups to North Texas

12/15/2014

That something is a growing influx of a new class of immigrants from Mexico — wealthy, well-educated and with ambition that knows no borders. Their presence is helping to transform Dallas into an increasingly important hub of North American trade and generating thousands of jobs in the region, according to the Dallas Regional Chamber.

In fact, since 2010 about 2,000 well-to-do Mexicans have brought their businesses to Texas or started new ones here, according to a Dallas Morning News analysis...

Alberto de la Peña, a native of Mexico City, arrived in Dallas in 2000 for what he thought would be a six-month legal course at SMU. He has stayed for more than 14 years, living a transnational life. De la Peña is now a law partner at Haynes and Boone in Dallas, where he helps business clients navigate the bureaucratic legal maze in Mexico.

“Being Mexican in Texas is an incredible advantage,” he said. “The opportunities back in Mexico are huge, but so are the challenges. Mexico is a whole different animal. ... You need to know how to navigate your way, or you lose everything.”

...De la Peña’s law partner, Eduardo Marquez, was host of the recent soiree atop the W hotel. It was the inaugural event for a newly formed organization for young professionals, an offshoot of the Association for Mexican Entrepreneurs...

Taking the microphone, Marquez, a native of Mexico City educated at Georgetown University, spoke of responsibility ahead and service to the community. Like the larger associations of Mexican business leaders, the young professionals have vowed to be active in their communities and to promote educational causes, such as scholarships for promising students.

“We have the great advantage of living in the Dallas-Fort Worth region,” he said. “This is the cradle for pioneering companies, whether energy, telecommunications or services. It’s a city filled with business opportunities and where being a young Hispanic represents a challenge, but also an enormous opportunity. Our goal is to transform ourselves for the betterment of our community.”

Excerpted from the Dallas Morning News. To read the full article, click here.

Related Practices

Email Disclaimer